"Small Freight containers"
of the former Soviet Union

A couple of shots of small containers, photographed in 1998 at Kishli goods station, Baku, in the Republic of Azerbaijan
(Oh, and a few wagons and engines too.)

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Photo no. 1: A Russian 'small container'
1. A typical "small container", about five feet wide, very common on railways of the former Soviet Union. This container has been loaded on a lorry at Kishli goods station in Baku.     Photo: Neil Worthington

 
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Photo no. 2: Another 'small container' on a different lorry
2. Another "small container" on a different lorry. These containers usually travel by rail in high sided open wagons which are more secure than flat wagons. At Kishli, they are handled by gantry crane inside a covered shed or "hangar". Unfortunately my shots inside the shed didn't come out very well.     Photo: Neil Worthington

 
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A long line of conventional goods wagons being shunted
3. Assorted conventional goods wagons being shunted at Kishli. Note the height of the packs of timber in the open wagons.     Photo: Neil Worthington

 
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Detail of the timber packs showing the generous loading gauge
4. The packs of timber are shown here in greater detail. They have been carefully constructed to take full advantage of the generous loading gauge.     Photo: Neil Worthington

 
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An electric loco backing onto a block oil train
5. An electric loco (of either VL8 or VL11 class - I only remember that the VL stands for Vladimir Lenin). It is setting back onto a heavy block oil train which already has an articulated electric loco at its head. Some of the oil tank wagons in this train are carried on four bogies - 8 axles, 16 wheels. The others are four axled wagons. (This railway doesn't mess about with 2 axled wagons.)     Photo: Neil Worthington

 
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A diesel loco shunting wagons at Baku train ferry sidings
6. A diesel loco shunting wagons in the sidings near Baku's train ferry dock. The ferry crosses the Caspian Sea to Turkmenbashi in Turkmenistan.     Photo: Neil Worthington

 

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This site is maintained by Neil Worthington.
This page was posted on 09 March 1999.
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All text and photographs are © 1998, Neil Worthington.